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British Medical Association calls for 20% extra tax on sugary drinks

DBR Staff Writer Published 14 July 2015

The British Medical Association (BMA) is calling for 20% extra tax on sugary drinks to reduce obesity in the UK.

BMA

BMA's 'Food for thought' report said that tax should be introduced on all sugar-sweetened beverages, which will increase the price by around 20%.

BMA says the extra tax will help to decrease the number of obese people in the country by about 180,000 people and the money generated can be used to provide subsidy on fruits and vegetables for poor people.

BMA has recommended that regulations should be developed to prohibit the marketing of unhealthy food and drink products to children and young people. Retailers, in particular, should be prohibited from displaying and promoting unhealthy food and drink products at checkouts and in queuing areas.

The organisation has also suggested that marketing of unhealthy food and drink products in schools should be prohibited.

Other recommendations restriction on sale of all unhealthy food and drink products in all NHS hospitals and fixing a one-year target for manufacturers, retailers and caterers to avoid producing or selling any food and drink products containing artificial trans fats in the country.

As reported in Guardian, sugar taxes are currently in force in few places, with Mexico setting it at 10% and Berkeley in California recently bringing in a tax.


Image: BMA's report suggested that tax should be introduced on all sugar-sweetened beverages. Photo: courtesy of maple/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net.