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Coca-Cola adopts three-colour calorie labeling scheme in UK

DBR Staff Writer Published 05 September 2014

Coca Cola Great Britain has volunteered to adopt UK Government’s ‘traffic light’ labeling scheme that gives details about the fat and calorie content in its products.

Coke

The drinks giant will modify the labeling of its products to include details such as the amount of fat, saturated fat, salt, sugar and energy (calories) they contain.

The front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme introduced by the government recommends food and beverage manufacturers to use red, orange and green colours to provide information on the levels of key nutrients in their products.

The voluntary scheme intends to provide consumers with easy access to fat details that will help them make better food choices.

The measure combines nutrient amounts and percentage Reference Intakes (RIs). RIs are guidelines that give the approximate amount of energy and particular nutrients that can be consumed as part of a healthy diet each day.

Coca Cola UK & Ireland general manager Jon Woods said: "The increased choice of products available in stores today is great news for shoppers and we believe that front-of-pack nutritional labelling can help people choose a balanced diet.

"We have monitored the labelling scheme since it started to appear in-store and asked shoppers in Great Britain for their views.

"They told us they want a single, consistent labelling scheme across all food and drink products to help them make the right choices for them and their families. That is why we have decided to adopt it across our full range of brands."

The colour coded labelling scheme will appear on packs during the first half of next year.


Image: New labelling on Coca-Cola's products will appear from next year. Photo courtesy of Coca-Cola.